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Fake Emails and Websites

Online fraud occurs when someone poses as a legitimate company to obtain sensitive personal data and illegally conducts transactions on your existing accounts. Often called “phishing” or “spoofing,” the most current methods of online fraud are fake emails, Web sites and pop-up windows, or any combination of these.

Always keep in mind that Cumberland Federal Bank will never send email containing attachments or require customers to send personal information to us via email or pop-up windows. Any unsolicited request for Cumberland Federal Bank account information you receive through emails, Web sites, or pop-up windows should be considered fraudulent and be reported immediately.

Fake emails will often:

Appear to be from a legitimate source

While some emails are easy to identify as fraudulent, others may appear to be from a legitimate address and trusted online source. However, you should not rely on the name or address in the “From” field, as this is easily altered.

Ask you for personal information

Fake emails often contain an overly generic greeting and may claim that your information has expired, been corrupted or been lost, and that you must immediately resend it.

Link to counterfeit Web sites

Fake emails may direct you to counterfeit Web sites carefully designed to look real, but which actually collect personal information for illegal use.

Link to real Web sites

In addition to links to counterfeit Web sites, some fake emails also include links to legitimate Web sites. The fraudsters do this in an attempt to make a fake email appear real.

Contain fraudulent phone numbers

Fake emails often contain telephone numbers that are tied to the fraudsters. Never call a number featured on an email you suspect is fraudulent, and be sure to double-check any numbers you do call.

Contain real phone numbers

Some of the telephone numbers listed in fake emails may be legitimate, connecting to actual companies. Just like with links, fraudsters include the real phone numbers in an effort to make the email appear to be legitimate.

Trojan Horses

These fake emails may also contain a virus known as a “Trojan Horse” that can record your keystrokes. The virus may live in an attachment or be accessed via a link in the email.

Again, Cumberland Federal Bank customers should keep in mind that we do not request personal information via email or send email attachments. Never respond to emails, open attachments, or click on links from suspicious or unknown senders.

If you’re not sure if a Cumberland Federal bank email is legitimate, report it to us without replying to the email.

How can I help protect myself?

With a few simple steps, you can help protect your Cumberland Federal Bank accounts and personal information from fake emails and Web sites:

  • Delete suspicious emails without opening them. If you do open a suspicious email, do not open any attachments or click on any links it may contain.
  • Never provide sensitive account or personal information in response to an email. If you have entered personal information, call Cumberland Federal Bank immediately at 1-715-822-2249.
  • Install and regularly update virus protection software.
  • Keep your computer operating system and Web browser current.

  

Ladysmith Branch

 

Cumberland Federal Bank

NOW OPEN IN LADYSMITH!


Cumberland Federal Bank is pleased to be a part of the Ladysmith community. With over 85 years of serving the Cumberland area, Cumberland Federal Bank looks forward to supporting the thriving commercial small business enterprises, community organizations and families that call Ladysmith home. Located at 312 W. 9th Street, North, Cumberland Federal Bank is a full service bank providing commercial banking services and traditional banking products with friendly exceptional service. Cumberland Federal Bank is now open Ladysmith to serve you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Scam Alert

There is a new scam involving online banking transfers. Fraudsters transfer money between accounts, then call pretending they need a refund. They ask money to be wired out. Be diligent in checking all of your accounts and ask bank personnel any questions. Watch for red flags such as: asking you to lie to bank personnel, saying they will give you money for your trouble, the person had no reason to give you money. Educate yourself: click on Education Center and Money IQ for information regarding scams.